Page Index Toggle Pages: [1] 2  Send Topic Send Topic Print Print
 10 PROPANE CYLINDERS (Read 942 times)
jimandme
Paddler
Offline



Posts: 2
Joined: May 12th, 2019
PROPANE CYLINDERS
Aug 4th, 2019 at 11:21am
Print Post Print Post  
JUST GOT A COLEMAN 2 BURNER.  HOW MANY 1 LB PROPANE  CYLINDERS DO I NEED FOR 4 PEOPLE 9 DAYS
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Jimbo
Voyageur
Inukshuk
Offline



Posts: 4196
Location: Minnesota
Joined: Oct 6th, 2002
Re: PROPANE CYLINDERS
Reply #1 - Aug 4th, 2019 at 12:17pm
Print Post Print Post  
jimandme -

Figure on getting 1.5 - 2.0 hours of cooking time per green cylinder (assuming it's the 14-16 ounce variety frequently used with Coleman's).  If it was my group of 4, I'm figuring on 30 minutes of use per breakfast and 60 minutes per supper.  Over nine days, that's 8 breakfasts X 30 minutes = 240 minutes AND that's 8 suppers X 60 minutes = 480 minutes.  Grand total = 720 minutes or 12 hours of use.  So, that's 6 cylinders.

Of course, you may be cooking over a campfire for some meals.  For other meals you may only need to heat up a little water to pour into oatmeal or a bag of dehydrated food.  To the extent you do those things, your need for cylinders goes DOWN.  Frankly, I'd feel pretty safe with 5 cylinders (generally speaking) and possibly even 4.

On the other hand, your need for cylinders goes UP if you get one or two that develop "leaks".  I had two go bad on me on a single trip one year and found myself cooking over a campfire to compensate.  Fortunately, there was no fire ban going on.

Bottom line: it's something of a crap shoot.  You make your best guess re: actual cooking minutes, apply the burn time per cylinder, then hope you get lucky.

As for me, I've started using Kelly Kettles as my "back-up system."  For fixing coffee and simply heating water for eat-in-the-bag meals, you can't beat them.  You can cook on them, too, but not nearly as well as with gas. 

Jimbo   Cool
  
Back to top
IP Logged
 
portage dog
Inukshuk
Offline



Posts: 418
Location: Virginia
Joined: Oct 26th, 2010
Re: PROPANE CYLINDERS
Reply #2 - Aug 5th, 2019 at 7:13pm
Print Post Print Post  
Jimbo,

Is that running just one burner or two at a time?  I run the backpacking stoves (MSR Windpro) and will take 6 of the 8 oz. isobutene/propane canisters for 4-6 people on a 10 day trip and usually come back with one full.  I do more than just boil water for freeze dried stuff (pancakes, red beans and rice, fish fry, fish chowder, eggs) and don't come near the cook times you are doing. 

So, J&M, like Jimbo says, depends on your cooking style, how much stove time you have and if you're running both burners.  I'd venture to say you'd probably do well with 4 - 1 pound bottles for 9 days if you use your fuel judiciously.  If you're perkin' a lot of coffee and making long cook foods, maybe toss in a 5th one.

pd
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Jimbo
Voyageur
Inukshuk
Offline



Posts: 4196
Location: Minnesota
Joined: Oct 6th, 2002
Re: PROPANE CYLINDERS
Reply #3 - Aug 6th, 2019 at 8:08am
Print Post Print Post  
I think mostly it comes down to what you're cooking and how you're cooking it.

Those propane "burn time" figures I was using DID seem a little "conservative" to me but they came straight from the manufacturer of those cylinders.  Re: using single vs. two-burner stoves, well... the way I look at it, using two burners uses propane twice as fast BUT requires approximately half the burn time.  In other words, feeding four people gets done in half-an-hour vs. an hour but, ultimately, uses about the same amount of fuel.

But I'm no cook, so what do I know?  I'm just doing the math.  There could easily be other considerations I'm simply not thinking of regarding fuel consumption.

However, we arrived at the number, it seems like both PD and I are saying you'd do well to pack 4 cylinders... and maybe toss in a 5th if you want to be extra safe.

Jimbo   Cool
  
Back to top
IP Logged
 
mpeebles
Inukshuk
Offline



Posts: 496
Location: Fond du Lac, WI
Joined: Feb 25th, 2018
Re: PROPANE CYLINDERS
Reply #4 - Aug 21st, 2019 at 8:28am
Print Post Print Post  
I'm late to the conversation but this is what I/we consume using a single burner Coleman.  For two of us we use approximately one, one lb. tank every three days.  This includes coffee, breakfast prep and a nightly fish fry along with the misc. apple cider, etc.  The fish fry consumes the vast majority of that usage.  I never did the actual burn time ( thanks Jimbo, I'll be using that).  One solo trips I use one half that amount or one lb. every six days.  As stated by others.....it all depends on what you're cooking.
Safe travels......Mike
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
intrepid_camper
Inukshuk
Offline



Posts: 1345
Location: Northern Minnesota
Joined: Jul 12th, 2004
Re: PROPANE CYLINDERS
Reply #5 - Nov 11th, 2019 at 11:40am
Print Post Print Post  
Another thought:  I recently purchased two of the new, large Coleman brand Butane cylinders which are supposed to work with MSR small burners.  They did work the first time I screwed a MSR burner on them and did just fine.  However I left the burner screwed in because I would use it for the next meal and was in camp.  The second time I tried to light the burner it did not want to light...seemed no gas was coming out.  This happened to me with both cylinders and two different MSR burners.  Worked fine the first time, but with burner left on would not light/pump fuel a few hours later when I wanted to cook something else.  Has anyone else had this happen to them?
The cylinders say "self sealing" so I am wondering if they might seal below the aperture which allows the burner to access the fuel when it is screwed into the canister?  My trip was nearing the end so I unscrewed the burners and brought them and cylinders home.  I have not had a chance to re-try them now to see if unscrewing the burners made a difference.  Huh Huh
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
portage dog
Inukshuk
Offline



Posts: 418
Location: Virginia
Joined: Oct 26th, 2010
Re: PROPANE CYLINDERS
Reply #6 - Nov 11th, 2019 at 5:21pm
Print Post Print Post  
IC - is this what you're referring to for butane canisters - (You need to Login or Register to view media files and links) And can you be more specific about what MRS stove you have?  I have experience with several models, but never had the situation you describe occur.  My first thought is did you possibly leave the valve slightly open and all of the gas escaped or maybe did not have the stove connection fully seated? If there is still gas in the canister (sloshes when you shake it) then that is not likely the issue. If not, you could possibly (but unlikely) have two defective stoves?  Self sealing means when you unscrew the stove connection/stove head/burner, the canister will seal the valve - much like a bike tire valve.  Some older style canister stoves would use a puncture method, so once you connected it, you would have to leave it that way until you ran the fuel out.  If staying in the same camp, I will occasionally leave the stove connected and not had any issue with subsequent uses.  I definitely do NOT recommend leaving any stove burner connected to a fuel canister while traveling.  The chances of either stove damage or fuel leakage by the valve getting bumped open are too great.

pd
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
intrepid_camper
Inukshuk
Offline



Posts: 1345
Location: Northern Minnesota
Joined: Jul 12th, 2004
Re: PROPANE CYLINDERS
Reply #7 - Nov 11th, 2019 at 8:41pm
Print Post Print Post  
PD, Thanks for some response.  No, the gas was still in the cylinders, in fact quite a lot of it.  Do not know the model of my stove; it is small and has a red triangular plastic tube case for travel.  Both stoves worked fine all summer with MSR or Optimus cylinders for fuel and worked fine for first run on the Coleman cylinders too.
Since I last tried using the stoves I have packed them away, and off the cylinders.  I just returned from the trip I was on and the stove/fuel are still packed away.  I will try them again when I get a chance and see if they want to work.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
solotripper
Inukshuk
Offline



Posts: 7371
Location: clarkston MI
Joined: Mar 14th, 2005
Re: PROPANE CYLINDERS
Reply #8 - Nov 11th, 2019 at 10:01pm
Print Post Print Post  
IC.

I did a little searching online about your problem and could find nothing about it.

I did find some posts about people having issues with Coleman propane cylinders because more than one vendo makes them.

Issues had to do with some of them having threading issues that caused low pressure/ no fuel at all. The threads should be coarse and deep on the bottles. The bad ones were fine/shallow and didn't hold the seal.

Since your stove worked fine with those other fuel canisters but not the Coleman, I'm thinking it might be a threading issue?  Maybe they worked the first time but the seal failed after sitting awhile.

One post talked about after having low pressure they removed and reattached stove every use which fixed their particular problem.

  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
MossBack
Inukshuk
Offline



Posts: 478
Location: Indiana
Joined: Feb 22nd, 2010
Re: PROPANE CYLINDERS
Reply #9 - Nov 11th, 2019 at 10:27pm
Print Post Print Post  
My own personal opinion is that all of the Butane/ Propane cylinders are manufactured in South Korea by the same company who private labels them as needed to the world.  The thread forms and seals are too uniform to be made by multiple vendors.  My guess would be you got a couple from the same bad lot.

MB
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: [1] 2 
Send Topic Send Topic Print Print

 
  « The Put-In ‹ Board  ^Top